掃除機496方式(英語名:HAL496 Systems)による英語などの学習方法を提唱するブログです。英文に関して、解説・対訳などの掲載を中心としています。訳し方は、そのときの状況によるので、直訳っぽいのもあったりします。転載及び2次使用可。(C) no rights reserved / aucun droits réservés / keine Rechte vorbehalten / 著作権全面放棄

10.06.2012

Love Vote―The Life of Jeannette Rankin対訳


1.1
Mr. Speakerrise today with a heavy heart ... September 11 changed the world.
議長、沈んだ心で、今日、私は立ち上がります……911は世界を変えました。
Our deepest fears now haunt us.
深刻な不安が、今、私たちにとり憑(つ)いています。
Yet am convinced (that military action will not prevent further acts of international terrorism against the United States).
とはいえ、軍事行為がアメリカ合衆国に対する国際テロリズムによるさらなる活動を防ぎはしないと私は確信しています[=防ぐとは、私には思えません
1.2
This is part of the speech {made by Congresswoman Barbara Lee of California}.
これは、カリフォルニア州選出の女性下院議員バーバラ=リーによってなされた演説の一部である。
In a single act of courageshe gave the one opposing vote in a resolution {that passed 420-1 in the U.S. House and 98-0 in the Senate}.
たったひとつの勇気ある行為において、下院で420対1、上院で98対1で可決した決議で、彼女はひとつの反対票を投じた。
The resolution gave the U.S. President the power {to use "all necessary force" against anyone {associated with the attacks of September 11, 2001}}.
2001年9月11日の攻撃に関わりのある者であるならばだれに対しても「すべての必要な武力」を用いる権限を、その決議案は、アメリカ合衆国大統領に与えた。
1.3
After the voteCongresswoman Lee was threatened by many angry people.
投票後、女性下院議員リーは多くの行かれる人々によって脅(おど)された。
For her own safetyit was necessary [that she have a bodyguard for some time].
彼女自身の安全のため、彼女が暫(しばら)くの間、護衛[orボディーガード]を雇うことは必要であった。
NB:haveが使われているのは、仮定法現在だから。
1.4
Some people in the media compared Athe attacks on the World Trading Center and Pentagon to BJapan's attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941.
マスメディアの一部の人々は世界貿易センタービルと国防総省とに対する攻撃を、1941年12月7日の真珠湾への日本の攻撃オに擬(なぞら)えた。
orマスコミには、世界貿易センタービルと国防総省とに対する攻撃を、1941年12月7日の真珠湾への日本の攻撃オに擬(なぞら)えた者もいた。
And they remembered one woman's nameJeannette Rankin.
さらに、ジャネット=ランキンというひとりの女性の名前を彼らは思い出した。
2.1
After Japan's attackCongress members voted for or against going to war.
日本の攻撃の後に、連邦議会議員は、開戦に踏み切ることに賛成するか、反対するかを投票した。
That votetoohad one lone dissenter out of 471 members of both HousesJeannette Rankina lifelong pacifist and feminist.
その投票(のとき)にも、両院の471名の議員のうち、ひとりの孤独な反対者、すなわち、ジャネット=ランキンという生涯を通じての平和主義者にして且(か)つ男女同権論者[or女性解放運動家]がいたのである。
2.2
Before votingRankin had listened to many wild, emotional speeches by other members of Congress.
投票前、ほかの議会議員による多くの乱暴で感情的な演説に、ランキンは耳を傾けた。
Americans were angry at the surprise attack.
アメリカ人[=アメリカ合衆国国民]は奇襲に憤慨(ふんがい)していたのだ。
The only thing {o the Congress members had | in mindwas [when to start the war against Japan].
連邦議会議員が心に抱(いだ)いていた唯一のものは、日本に対する戦争をいつ始めるかということであった。
or日本に対する戦争をいつ始めるかということだけを連邦議会議員は心に抱(いだ)いていた。
War fever dominated both Houses.
戦争への熱狂は両院を支配した。
But this did not influence Rankin.
しかし、このことはランキンには影響を与えることはなかった。
For more than twenty years she had worked hard for world peace.
20年以上に亙(わた)って、彼女は世界の平和のために懸命に取り組んでいた。
She wanted to make it clear [that war is wrong].
彼女は、戦争は間違っているということをはっきりとさせたかった。
2.3
She rose slowly and said, "As a womancan't go to warso refuse to send anyone else."
彼女はゆっくりと立ち上がり、言った。「女性として、私は戦争には行けませんから、ほかにいかなる者をも(戦場に)送り出すことを拒みます。
(The moment she voted "no,") several Congress people in the hall shouted insults at her.
彼女が反対票を投じた瞬間、本会議場にいた議会議員のうちの数人が、彼女に対して侮蔑のことばを投げかけた。
She was called a "weak woman" and a "disgrace to America."
彼女は「弱っちい女」「アメリカの面汚(つらよご)し」と呼ばれた。
(When she stepped out of the room,) she found the hall full of angry people.
その部屋[=本会議場]から歩いて出て行ったとき[→歩みだしたとき]、彼女は怒れる人々でいっぱいの議会場が怒れる人々でいっぱいであることに気づいた。
They crowded around hercrying out, "Change your vote!"
彼らは彼女の周囲に群がり、「投票を変えろ![→投票を取り消せ!]」と叫んでいた。
3.1
In factthis was not the first time {o Rankin voted against a declaration of war}.
実際のところ、このことは、ランキンが宣戦布告に反対票を投じた最初ではなかった。
In August 1914World War I broke out in Europe.
1914年8月に、ヨーロッパで第1次世界大戦が勃発した。
It was a terrible conflictand for quite some time most Americans felt [that the United States should stay out of a European war].
それは怖ろしいまでの紛争であり、ずいぶんと長い間、アメリカ合衆国はヨーロッパの戦争には関わらないべきであるとほとんどのアメリカ人は感じていた。
3.2
Then in April 1915Germany announced [that it would attack any ship {traveling to and from Britain}].
その後、1915年4月に、英国へと入航したり、出航したりするいかなる船舶をも攻撃するとドイツが声明を出した。
In May of that yeara passenger shipthe Lusitaniawas attacked.
その年の5月に、旅客船ルシタニア号が攻撃された。
Nearly 1,200 people diedincluding many Americans.
およそ1200名の乗客が死亡したが、多くのアメリカ人を含んでいた[→多くのアメリカ人が含まれていた]。
Public opinion began to change toward helping Britain and France in the war.
世論(せろん)[→輿論(よろん)]は戦争において英国とフランスを手助けする方向へと変化し始めた。
Two years lateron April 21917President Wilson called upon Congress for a declaration of war.
2年後、1917年4月2日に、ウィルソン大統領は宣戦布告のために議会を召集した。
3.3
Before the voteJeannette sat silently.
投票の前に、ジャネットは黙って席に着いた。
Then she rose and gripped the chair in front of her.
それから、彼女は立ち上がり、自分の前の椅子を摑(つか)んだ。
Finallylifting her eyesshe said softly: "want to stand by my countrybut cannot vote for war.
遂(つい)には、彼女は、目を上げてから、静かに語った。「私は祖国の力に成りたいと考えていますが、しかし、先頭に賛成票を投ずるわけにはいきません」
3.4
Forty-nine other Congress members joined her in saying "no," but she was by far the most criticized.
ほかに49人の連邦議会議員が彼女同様に「NO」と言うことに加わったが、しかし、彼女はとび抜けて最も批判された。
Newspapers falsely said [# she cried while voting].
彼女は投票中に泣いたと新聞は誤って報じた。
People thought [her decision came from weakness] and [that she was unpatriotic].
彼女の決断は弱さに由来し、彼女には愛国心がないと人々は考えた。
4.1
Jeannette Rankin was born in Montana in 1880.
ジャネット=ランキンは1880年モンタナ州で生まれた。
Her fatherJohnwas a rancher and her motherOlivea former schoolteacher.
父のジョンは農場経営者であり、母のオリーヴは元教師であった。
In those dayslife in Montana was more difficult than in many places.
当時、モンタナ州での暮らしは、(ほかの)多く場所よりも厳(きび)しかった。
Men and women worked as equals with much of the hard outdoor work.
男性と女性は(ともに)、厳しい屋外での労働の大部分を、対等な者として[→対等に]取り組んだ。
But men and women were not equal in many ways.
しかし、男性と女性は多くの点で平等ではなかった。
For instanceat election timewomen were not allowed to vote.
たとえば、選挙時に、女性は投票を許されていなかった。
4.2
(After Rankin graduated from college in 1902,) she became a social worker for the poor.
1902年に大学を卒業すると、ランキンは貧しい人々のためにソーシャルワーカーになった。
In 1910(while living in Seattle,) she met a group of people {working for women's voting rights}.
1910年、シアトルで暮らしている間に、女性の投票権に取り組む人々のグループに彼女は出会った。
She became involved in their movement.
彼女はその運動に関わるようになった。
After months of hard workwomen gained the right {to vote in Washington State}.
数か月に亙(わた)る懸命な取り組みの後、投票する権利[=選挙権]をワシントン州で女性は獲得(かくとく)した。
→数か月間にわたって懸命に取り組んだ結果、ワシントン州は女性に選挙権を与えた。
4.3
(When she returned to Montana,) she gave speeches for women's rights throughout the state.
モンタナ州に戻ったとき、その州[=モンタナ州]のいたるところで女性の投票権獲得に向けての演説を彼女は行なった。
Thanks to years of effort by Rankin and othersMontana women were finally allowed to vote in 1914.
ランキンとほかの人々による数年にわたる努力のおかげで、1914年に、モンタナ州の女性は、最終的に、投票することを許された。
4.4
Rankin was encouraged by these events.
ランキンはこうした出来事によって勇気づけられた。
She wanted to work for the welfare of women and children everywhereand she decided to run for the U.S. Congress.
彼女はどこでも女性と子どもたちの福祉の役に立ちたいと考えており、(その結果)彼女はアメリカ合衆国連邦議会に立候補することを決意した。
(Being a woman,it was doubtful [whether she would be elected].
女性であったので、彼女が選出されるかどうかは疑問であった。
In 1916howeverJeannette Rankin did become the first woman {elected to the Congress of the United States}.
しかしながら、1916年に、ジャネット=ランキンは、アメリカ合衆国連邦議会に選出された最初の女性に、実際に、なったのであった。
5.1
Jeannette Rankin voted against war twice.
ジャネット=ランキンは2度、戦争に反対する投票を行なった。
Both timesmany people criticized herbut some praised her for her courage.
どちらの場合も、多くの人々が彼女を批判したが、しかし、一部の人々はその勇気に対して彼女を讃(たた)えた。
→いずれの場合も、多くの人々が彼女を批判したが、しかし、彼女の勇気を讃(たた)える人もいた。
5.2
(When she voted "no" in 1941,) one person wrote to her, "Your one little vote stands out like a bright star on a dark night."
1941年に彼女が反対票を投じたとき、ある人物は彼女に書いた。「あなたのひとつのちっぽけな投票は暗い夜に輝く星のように際立(きわだ)っています」
A newspaper also supported hersaying, "A hundred years from nowpeople will understand the true courage of Jeannette Rankin.  She wouldn't go a step outside her belief [that war is wrong]."
ある新聞もまた、彼女を支援して、つぎのように評した。「今から100年後、人々はジャネット=ランキンの真の勇気を理解するだろう。戦争は間違っているという彼女の信念を外れた歩みを進めることないだろう」
5.3
After World War IIRankin continued to work for peace.
第2次世界大戦後、ランキンは平和のために取り組み続けた。
She gave speeches throughout the world.
彼女は世界の至るところで演説を行なった。
In 1968she led as many as five thousand women in a protest against the Vietnam War.
1968年、ベトナム戦争に反対する抗議運動において5000人もの女性を彼女は率いた。
5.4
Late in her lifeshe was asked [if she regretted voting "no."]
人生の晩年に、反対票を投じたことを後悔しているかどうかを彼女は訊ねられた。
"Never," she answered.
「決してありません」と彼女は答えた。
"(If you're against war,) you're against war regardless of [what happens]."
戦争に反対であるならば、何が起こるとしても、戦争に反対なのです」
(Shortly before she died in 1973,) Jeannette said to a friend, "can leave this world now (only because know [have done all {o could | for world peace}])."
1973年に彼女が亡くなる直前に、ジャネットは友人に語った。「自分が世界の平和のために行なうことができるすべてを行なったということがわかっているからこそ、私は今、この世界から猿ことができるのです」
5.5
Todayin the U.S. Congress Buildingthere is a statue of Jeannette Rankin.
今日、アメリカ合衆国連邦議会議事堂には、ジャネット=ランキンの像がある。
On the base of it are her words: "cannot vote for war."
その台座には、「私は戦争賛成の票を投ずることができない」ということばがある。

0 件のコメント:

自分の写真

和歌山県橋本市出身。世界文化遺産である高野山の麓です。
和歌山県立橋本高等学校を経て、早稲田大学第一文学部哲学科哲学専修卒業。
B型Rh+。天秤座。家紋は「丸に九枚笹」。
大叔父(おおおじ)は精鋭集団である帝国陸軍航空審査部所属で、「キ61(きろくいち)の神様」と呼ばれた坂井雅夫少尉。キ61は三式戦闘機「飛燕(ひえん)」のことである。

フォロワー